Although Pasadena City Council members have placed campaign finance reform for local races before the voters with November’s Measure B, they aren’t ready to support public financing of state election campaigns, the group decided Monday.

Hailed by good government activists as a way to curb the influence of wealthy special interest and lobbying groups, Proposition 89 would limit the amount of money any person, business or political action committee could give to a single candidate while allowing candidates the choice of limiting campaign spending and using public funds.

The proposition is supported by the California Nurses Association, the League of Women Voters of California, original Measure B-sponsors the Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights and various senior, minority, union, environment and peace groups.

Several activists attended Monday’s meeting to urge the council to endorse Proposition 89, including a nurse who blamed insurance company spending on political campaigns for stifling health care reform, a local business owner and members of the senior community.

Following public discussion, Councilman Paul Little moved to support Proposition 89 — the California Clean Money and Fair Elections Act — but failed to find a second for that motion.

Measure B is a modification of the city’s 2001 Taxpayer Protection Amendment, which was also known as Measure B and bans city officials from accepting money from people whom their decisions have benefited.

Little, ironically, opposed sending the popular second Measure B back to voters, believing its restrictions unfair.